Personal Finance


Personal Finance is the practical application of the guidelines of finance to all monetary activities of a person or the whole family. It deals with the methods in which a person or family gain, budget, save, and spend money on a certain period of time, taking into consideration a variety of financial risks along with future life events. There are plenty of financial products a person might look into when planning for personal finances : among them are banking products savings accounts, checking account, credit cards and personal loans), investment (bonds, stock market, mutual funds) and insurance products (health insurance, life insurance, disability insurance). There is also contribution and tracking social security benefits or retirement plans of a person or sponsored by employer, and income tax management.

Personal financial planning

Financial planning is the main aspect of personal finance, which is an engaging process that needs routine monitoring and reevaluation. Generally, this calls for five stages:What Is Personal Finance by PracticalFinancialTips

The assessment: A person’s financial condition can be assessed by putting together his or her financial statements which includes income statements and balance sheets. An individual balance sheet details the valuations of personal assets such as vehicle, real estate property, jewelry, stock and bank account, together with personal liabilities such as mortgage, bank loan or credit card debt. An individual income statement details personal income and expenses.
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Financial advisors are so uncomfortable speaking about life insurance that more than half, 56 percent, simply don’t do it, according to a recent survey by Saybrus Partners Inc.

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Further, almost one-fifth (18%) said they were “uncomfortable” or “very uncomfortable” recommending life insurance policies to their clients. Just a third (34%) of the financial advisors surveyed said they were “very comfortable” recommending life insurance to their clients.

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How much money should I withdraw annually from my portfolio when I retire?

I get that question a lot from friends and family. (Occupational hazard.) It’s also one of the most hotly debated issues in financial planning. Why? First, it’s important; we all hope to live happily in retirement. Second, every person’s situation is unique, so there’s no standard set of spending assumptions for retirement planning. Third, market returns may be mean-reverting over long time periods, but a person’s retirement happens over a specific time period, parts of which may deviate significantly from longer-term average returns that are used to forecast future asset values.

Let’s start with why the question is so critical. Ideally, you’ve been saving for four to five decades to build your nest egg. Now that you’ve stopped working, you want to use that hard-earned money for daily expenses, health care and the things you wanted to do while you were working — like taking a month-long African safari. But you also want to make sure your money lasts until you or your spouse dies, whichever comes later. Often, you want it to last even longer: Many people hope to pass along some of their assets to their children, grandchildren and other loved ones.

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It’s not difficult to figure out how the job market works. The most secure, best-paying positions are the one’s with the least amount of applicants because either too few people are qualified, or nobody wants to take them. As anyone with an established career knows, there are times when you have to weigh salary versus general happiness, as the two don’t always coexist. To some, making $90,000 in exchange for putting in long, arduous hours in a terrible work environment is worth it; others are content with $45,000 and a mostly stress-free 40-hour work week. The following jobs have more characteristics pertaining to the former than the latter, which is why they probably aren’t worth the (relatively) high pay. Note: Salaries from payscale.com are for workers with 10 to 19 years of experience in the profession. Salaries from simplyhired.com are averages from all workers, regardless of experience.

1. Gastroenterologist, $122,339-$397,317

Being a Gastroenterologist comes without the usual glamour that’s associated with being a doctor, as, well, the job requires examination of the digestive system, specifically the intestines, stomach, esophagus, gallbladder, pancreas and liver. Dealing with the problems associated with those areas can be messy and quite unpleasant for the patient, with whom the gastroenterologist becomes intimately acquainted.

2. Surgeon, $96,204-$364,895

Routinely ranked as one of the most stressful jobs in existence, surgeons are afforded minimal margin for error during their unpredictable, tedious hours of work. In addition to the possibility of witnessing death and even facing lawsuits, they have to deal with hostile patients and family members, and sometimes embittered hospital staff workers who offer little help. Because they spend roughly 80 hours per week in the hospital, their social lives and family lives leave a lot to be desired, negating a lot of the benefits that come with the high pay.
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None of us really want to consider our very own passing, and that is most likely why those who ought to make a will usually do not get around to it. Wills online supplies a straightforward solution to going through what’s going to happen with your things when you die.

You can’t say everyone is convinced that online wills happen to be an effective way of to make your own last choices crystal clear to the individuals you leave after you die because not all wills are identical.

It is easy to ease the process of making a will while there are actually different types of wills from which to choose. Wills online recognise that not sll circumstances are the same and which means you will find four different kinds of wills that you could look at. Among the issues with a lot of wills that are written on the internet is they are definitely not authored by professionals. When using wills online you will find that no matter what will you choose it is compiled by a legal expert in that particular niche.

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The “Bargain Stock Monitor” is one of three market statistics used as performance expectation analyzers for portfolios that are designed and managed using the Market Cycle Investment Management (MCIM) methodology.

It is derived from the month end Investment Grade Value Stock Index (IGVSI) “watchlist” screening program, which identifies IGVSI companies that are trading at least 15% below their 52-week highs.

The “15% down” break-point allows you to keep your eye on “Bull Pen” items. (You really need to be familiar with the selection rules to get the most from the BS Monitor – chuckle – and from the Watch List program.)

The fewer IGVSI equities at bargain prices, the stronger the stock market and the more “smart cash” you should be accumulating in the equity asset allocation “bucket” of your investment portfolio. As the list of bargain stocks grows (indicating market weakness), portfolio “smart cash” should be finding its way back into undervalued securities.

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Caring for our pets can sometimes stretch budgets, we love our pets and are willing to do anything for them. Yahoo! Finance’s Farnoosh Torabi has rounded up some ways to save money on the care and feeding of our fluffy friends–from buying less food, choosing adoption, and learning some do-it-yourself grooming techniques.

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